Indian Mutton Soup (Mutton Bone Soup)

A bowl of hearty mutton bone soup is all you need to warm up your day. With simple ingredients and easy-to-follow steps, this Indian mutton soup recipe will guide you in creating a comforting bowl of soup that your whole family will love. Discover the secret to extracting all the rich flavors from the mutton bones, resulting in a broth that’s both delicious and nourishing.

Mutton bone soup in a blue bowl.

Why you’ll love this mutton bone soup recipe

  1. Rich and robust flavor: Indian mutton soup is the perfect way to make the most of those mutton bones. With a well-balanced blend of spices, the bones add a depth of flavor to the soup. This results in a rich and hearty broth that’s deeply satisfying.
  2. Nourishing and wholesome: Mutton bone soup is packed with essential nutrients, collagen, and minerals that promote overall health and well-being.
  3. Comforting and warming: Like my spicy cauliflower soup, this soup is also perfect for cold days or when you need a comforting pick-me-up. The warm broth of mutton bone soup is like a cozy hug for your soul.
  4. Economical and sustainable: Using mutton bones in the soup is a great way to reduce waste and be cost-effective.
  5. Boosts immunity: The nutrients and minerals present in mutton bone soup can support your immune system, helping you stay healthy.
  6. Supports joint health: The collagen from the bones may contribute to joint health and alleviate discomfort.
  7. Easy to make: Preparing mutton bone soup is simple, making it accessible even to beginner cooks.
  8. Versatile: You can customize the soup by adding various vegetables, herbs, and spices to suit your taste preferences.
  9. Filling and satiating: Mutton bone soup makes for a substantial healthy dinner that keeps you full and satisfied for longer.
  10. A taste of tradition: Mutton bone soup is a timeless classic in many cultures, bringing a sense of nostalgia and heritage to your dining table.
  11. Feeds a crowd: It’s an excellent option for gatherings and family meals, as you can make a large batch to serve everyone.

You don’t need to be an expert chef to enjoy the rich goodness of mutton soup. Even if you’re new to cooking, fear not! My step-by-step instructions will make the process a breeze.

So, roll up your sleeves and get ready to savor the heartwarming taste of this mutton paya soup.

Mutton leg soup in a blue bowl.

Mutton soup ingredients

(You can find the exact measurements and instructions in the printable recipe card at the end of this page.)

Labelled ingredients for mutton bone soup.
  • Mutton: Bones give flavor to this soup. However, you can choose the ones with flesh so that the soup has some meat, too. This recipe is best suited for mutton legs, but you can use other bone-in cuts, too.
  • Dal: Toor dal (split pigeon pea or yellow lentils) is traditionally used for mutton soup masala. It gives body, flavor and additional nutrients to the soup. You can also use moong dal (split and skinned mung beans).
  • Whole spices: Cinnamon, cloves, cardamom and star anise can be replaced with ½ teaspoon of garam masala. You can use 1 teaspoon ground coriander, ½ teaspoon pepper, ½ teaspoon fennel powder and ½ teaspoon cumin instead of the whole spices.
  • Ginger-garlic paste: Grate 5 cloves of garlic and 1-inch piece of ginger.
  • Herbs: Be generous with mint and coriander leaves. They add even more flavor to this soup. You can use double the amount of mint leaves if you don’t have coriander leaves.

How to make mutton soup: step by step

Make mutton soup masala

This is similar to the spice blend I used for the black chana soup. The spices are also similar to those you need to make the chicken broth for lemon coriander soup.

Dry roast toor dal (split pigeon pea or yellow lentils) on low flame for 5 minutes.

Dal (split lentils) in a pink wok pan.

Add whole spices: coriander seeds, peppercorns, cardamom, cinnamon, cloves and star anise. Roast for a couple of minutes.

Roasted dal with whole spices in a pink wok pan.

Add fennel and cumin seeds. Roast for another 2 minutes.

Roasted dal and whole spices with cumin and fennel seeds in a pink wok pan.

If you’re using ground spices as mentioned in the ingredient notes, add them to the roasted dal and turn off the flame immediately.

Remove from heat and let them cool.

Roasted dal and spices in a blender jar.

Blend the dal and spices in a spice blender into a fine powder. You just made an awesome mutton soup masala!

Blended spice mix for mutton soup in a blender jar.

This spice blend can also be used for recipes like vegetable kurma, mutton masala, easy chicken curry or clear chicken soup to enhance the flavors and add body to the soup. In my opinion, this is one of the most flavorful thickening agents you can add to soups.

Sauté

Heat olive oil in a large pan. (You can also directly sauté in a pressure cooker or instant pot). Sauté bay leaves and finely chopped onions until translucent.

Onions and bay leaf in a pink wok pan.

Add ginger-garlic paste or grated ginger and garlic. Sauté until roasted and the raw smell disappears.

Ginger-garlic paste with onions and bay leaf in a pink wok pan.

Add finely chopped tomatoes. Sauté until they are cooked to a mushy consistency.

Finely chopped tomatoes with ginger garlic paste, onions and bay leaf in a pink wok pan.

Add mutton bones and sauté for a few minutes.

Mutton bones with onion tomato mixture in a pink wok pan.

Stir until the flesh on the bones is no longer pink and everything is well incorporated.

Sauteed mutton bones with onion tomato mixture in a pink wok pan.

Add spices and water

Add 1 cup of water first. Stir and add more.

Water being added to mutton bones with onion tomato mixture in a pink wok pan.

Sprinkle turmeric and the blended ‘mutton soup masala’. Mix well without any lumps. Alternatively, you can mix the ground spices with a little water and add. That will make it easier to stir.

Mutton soup spice blend and turmeric added to mutton bones with onion tomato mixture in a pink wok pan.

Pressure cook

Transfer the contents to a pressure cooker (if you’ve not been using one from the start).

Indian mutton soup with bones and spice blend ready to be cooked in a pressure cooker.

Cover and pressure cook on high flame. After the first whistle, reduce the flame and simmer for 45 minutes. Let the pressure release naturally.

If using instant pot, choose pressure-cook mode and set the timing to 45 minutes. Wait for natural pressure release.

Cooked mutton soup in a pressure cooker.

Garnish and serve

Stir the soup and serve in bowls. Garnish with fresh coriander and mint leaves.

Mutton paya soup in a blue bowl.

Recipe tips

  • Extra spice: If you like to add a spicy kick to the soup, add a dried red chili (or ½ teaspoon of chili flakes) while roasting the spices for the soup masala.
  • Cook time: The simmering time depends on the size and quality of the mutton bones. Mine were quite large, so I set the cooking time to an hour. If you’re not sure, stick to an hour. Overcooked soup still tastes good. The flesh might fall off the bones and disintegrate into the soup. In other words, it gets more delicious πŸ˜‰
  • Mutton bones: You can use mutton ribs instead of mutton legs. In that case, the simmering time can be reduced to 30 minutes.

More soups

1 2
Indian mutton soup in a blue bowl.

Indian Mutton Soup Recipe

Make delicious Indian mutton soup with simple ingredients and easy-to-follow steps. Discover the secret to extracting all the rich flavors from the bones, resulting in a nourishing mutton bone soup.
Author: Sheeba
Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 1 hour 10 minutes
Natural pressure release 10 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 30 minutes
Course dinner, Main Course, Soup
Cuisine Indian
Servings 4 people
Calories 500 kcal

Ingredients
  

Mutton soup masala

  • 1 tablespoon toor dal (split pigeon pea or yellow lentils)
  • 2 teaspoons coriander seeds
  • 1 teaspoon peppercorns
  • 2 pods cardamom
  • 2 cloves
  • 1 star anise
  • 1 inch cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon fennel seeds
  • 1 teaspoon cumin seeds

Mutton bone soup

  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 2 onions, finely chopped
  • teaspoons ginger-garlic paste
  • 2 tomatoes, finely diced
  • 1 kilogram mutton bones (2.2 pounds)
  • teaspoons salt
  • ½ teaspoon turmeric
  • ¼ cup chopped mint leaves
  • ¼ cup chopped coriander leaves

Instructions
 

Make mutton soup masala

  • Dry roast 1 tablespoon toor dal (split pigeon pea or yellow lentils)on low flame for 5 minutes.
  • Add whole spices:
    2 teaspoons coriander seeds, 1 teaspoon peppercorns, 2 pods cardamom, 2 cloves, 1 star aniseand 1 inch cinnamon.
    Roast for a couple of minutes.
  • Add 1 teaspoon fennel seeds and 1 teaspoon cumin seeds. Roast for another 2 minutes. Remove from heat and let them cool.
  • Blend the dal and spices in a spice blender into a fine powder. Keep aside.

Sauté

  • Heat 2 teaspoons olive oil in a large pan. (You can also directly sauté in a pressure cooker or instant pot).
    Sauté 2 bay leaves and 2 onions, finely chopped until the onions turn translucent.
  • Add 1½ teaspoons ginger-garlic paste. Sauté until roasted and the raw smell disappears.
  • Add 2 tomatoes, finely diced. Sauté until they are cooked to a mushy consistency.
  • Place 1 kilogram mutton bones in the pan. Sauté for a few minutes until the flesh attached to the bones are no longer pink.

Add spices and water

  • Add 4½ cups of water. (Add 1 cup of water first. Stir and add more.)
  • Sprinkle ½ teaspoon turmeric, 1½ teaspoons salt and the blended ‘mutton soup masala’. Mix well without any lumps.
  • Alternatively, you can mix the ground spices with a little water and add. That will make it easier to stir.

Pressure-cook

  • Transfer the contents to a pressure cooker (if you’ve not been using one from the start).
  • Cover and pressure cook on high flame. After the first whistle, reduce the flame and simmer for 45 minutes.
  • Let the pressure release naturally.

If using instant pot

  • Sauté according to the above instructions (in sauté mode). Once you stir in the mutton bones, add water and ground spices and cover with the lid.
  • Choose pressure-cook mode and set the timing to 45 minutes.
  • Wait for natural pressure release.

Garnish and serve

  • Taste the soup and adjust water, salt and pepper. Stir the soup and serve in bowls.
  • Garnish with ¼ cup chopped mint leaves and ¼ cup chopped coriander leaves.

Notes

  • Mutton: Bones give flavor to this soup. However, you can choose the ones with flesh so that the soup has some meat, too. This recipe is best suited for mutton legs, but you can use other bone-in cuts, too.
  • Mutton ribs: You can use mutton ribs instead of mutton legs. In that case, the simmering time can be reduced to 30 minutes.
  • Dal: Toor dal (split yellow lentils) is traditionally used for mutton soup masala. It gives body, flavor and additional nutrients to the soup. You can also use moong dal (split and skinned mung beans).
  • Substitution for whole spices: Cinnamon, cloves, cardamom and star anise can be replaced with ½ teaspoon of garam masala. You can use 1 teaspoon ground coriander, ½ teaspoon pepper, ½ teaspoon fennel powder and ½ teaspoon cumin instead of the whole spices.
  • How to replace with ground spices: Add them to the roasted dal after step 1 to make the soup masala and turn off the flame immediately. Stir for a couple of minutes in the warm pan. (The residual heat is enough to roast the ground spices.)
  • Ginger-garlic paste: Grate 5 cloves of garlic and 1-inch piece of ginger. 
  • Herbs: Be generous with mint and coriander leaves. They add even more flavor to this soup. You can use double the amount of mint leaves if you don’t have coriander leaves.
  • Mutton soup masala: This spice blend can also be used for recipes like vegetable kurma, mutton curry, chicken curry or chicken soup. It enhances the flavors and adds body to the soup or curry.
  • Extra spice: If you like to add a spicy kick to the soup, add a dried red chili (or ½ teaspoon of chili flakes) while roasting the spices for the soup masala.
  • Cook time: The simmering time depends on the size and quality of the mutton bones. If you’re not sure, stick to an hour. Overcooked soup still tastes good. The flesh might fall off the bones and disintegrate into the soup. In other words, it gets more delicious.
Nutrition facts for mutton bone soup

β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…Did you try this recipe? Please give a star rating in the comments below β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…β˜…

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Author profile photo

Hi! I’m Sheeba, welcome to Go Healthy ever after!

I have a passion for cooking delicious nourishing food that’s easy to cook with fresh natural ingredients free from additives or preservatives. The easy healthy recipes you find here will inspire you to cook with creativity.

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